Skip to main content
DailyNoah.com may receive compensation from affiliate partners for some links on the site. Read our full Disclosure here.

U.S. Census Bureau Mishaps Spell Trouble for Red States


225 views

According to a post-2020 census survey, the U.S. Census Bureau significantly undercounted the population of Florida, as well as Arkansas, Illinois, Mississippi, Tennessee and Texas.

At the same time, it overcounted the population of eight states, all but one of which is a blue state.

The overcounted states included: Delaware (+5.45%), Hawaii (+6.79%), Massachusetts (+2.24%), Minnesota (+3.84%), New York (+3.44%), Ohio (+1.49%), Rhode Island (+5.05%) and Utah (+2.59%).

Daily Caller reported:

The 2020 errors were discovered when the Census Bureau interviewed a large number of households across the country and compared the answers it got to the original census responses in 2020. In addition to undercounting six states, the survey showed that the Bureau overcounted the population of Delaware, Hawaii, Massachusetts, Minnesota, New York, Ohio, Rhode Island and Utah.

Funny coincidence – the Census made its largest overcount percentage error in President Joe Biden’s tiny home state of Delaware, which was overcounted by 5.45%. But Rhode Island and Minnesota were also overcounted by 5.05% and 3.84%, respectively, which allowed each of them to keep a congressional seat to which they are not entitled.

Minnesota, according to the original census report, would have lost a congressional seat during reapportionment if it had 26 fewer residents; the survey shows the state was overcounted by 216,971 individuals. Similarly, Rhode Island would have lost a seat if the Census Bureau had counted 19,000 fewer residents. It turns out that the state was overcounted by more than 55,000 individuals.

So both states will continue to have more representation in Congress, and more votes in the Electoral College, than they should. The same is true of Colorado, which was awarded a new congressional seat that it should not have gotten.

Contrast that with Texas, which the Census Bureau survey says was undercounted by almost 2%. That represents over a half a million Texans, which means that, like Florida, Texas was cheated out of an additional member of Congress. At that time, the Census Bureau said that Texas needed only 189,000 more people to gain another congressional seat. Turns out Texas already had them.

Arkansas had the largest percentage undercount at 5.04%, which represented over 150,000 residents of the state.

In addition to gaining congressional seats, the overcounted states will receive a larger share of federal funding distributed to the states over the next decade.

Undercounted states will receive less funds than they should due to the census errors.

The scope of this problem, compared to 2010, was unusually high.

And the Census Bureau has not offered any explanation as to how this happened.

“There is no remedy in the federal statutes governing the census and apportionment to correct this problem,” the Daily Caller noted.

Will Congress investigate the Census Bureau to figure out how this happened?

That remains to be seen!


 

Join the conversation!

Thanks for sharing!
Send this to a friend